Original Cowgirl Clothing

I have had some requests to do a series on plus size clothing for riders. This time I talk with Mike Satterfield of Original Cowgirl Clothing brand. 

My name is Mike Satterfield I am the creative director for RBR Inc. and designer for Original Cowgirl® and M&P Speed Shop™ and have worked in design and marketing my entire life. We are based in Southern California, with a showroom in Denver, Colorado.

How did the company get started & how long have you been in business?

Original Cowgirl® as a brand grew out of my family history, the concept was based on my Great Grandmother, my Grandma, my mother and aunts. Our parent company RBR Inc. which stands for Red Barn Ranch was founded in 1985 by my mother, Kathy Satterfield, back then it was more focused on home décor. In the early 2000’s I introduced our first clothing items and they proved popular locally. The brand really took on its own in 2007 and we shifted our focus to wholesale, with an emphases on independent retailers.

What is your company philosophy and goal for the company?

Original Cowgirl® is not your average apparel company, nowadays; anyone can have a t-shirt or garment made, but unlike most brands, each Original Cowgirl® shirt is hand prepped, loaded, printed, finished, and tagged, by us, right here in  Southern, California. Our design studio is in a 110 year old barn on the family ranch, that allows the creative process to be inspired by the surrounding ranches and farms. We draw from our heritage and strive to channel the history and passion that built the Ranch into each garment.

What types of clothing do you carry?

We are known for our graphic t-shirts and caps, but we also have a great line of accessories and jewelry.

What are some of your favorite pieces, and why?

That is hard because as the person to does the art each one tells a story and is based on a real person, place, or event. I think the road trip inspired graphics are some of my favorite since I am an avid traveler.

Do you plus size clothes run smaller or larger?

It will depend on the cut and style of course, but we try to keep everything true to size and on our retail site we have sizing charts. Some of our dolman cuts allow women to go up or down a size depend on the style they want. Our clearly listed size charts keep returns to a minimum.

What new items are you looking at carrying?

We come out with new prints and styles every month, so it’s always changing. But we expect to expand in to more outerwear and other garments down the road.

 

What stores carry your brand? 

We have retailers all around the country including Lil Bees BohemianCamo and Lace in Wilburton OK,  Maverick in Fort Worth Texas, and countless others around the country. Of course you can always shop at OriginalCowgirlClothingCo.com.

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I Support Rodeo

This week’s post is actually a commentary I made on the Cowgirls With Curves facebook page last week…

After a comment about abuse on a rodeo meme pic, I feel like I need to make a statement.

I try not to post political crap on this page because that’s not what it’s about. This is a place for we as horse folks of all disciplines to come together and be encouraged and get a laugh every now and then, but I will take a stand on this.

I support rodeo and I will always support rodeo. I personally have only barrel raced at NBHA jackpots and a couple of futurities, but I’ve never ran rodeo. It’s always been a dream of mine ever since I was a kid in the 70’s watching the Hesston commercials for the NFR, and one day I will rodeo, good Lord willing. I have lots of friends that rodeo, have been involved with rodeo ministry in years past, and the love of my life is an old bull rider. So my ties with rodeo come from the heart.

Some folks might assume I’m this way because they think I’m just a barrel racer or that’s all I do. They are sadly mistaken. Yes, I love to barrel race but that’s not all I do or all I am. I’ve shown hunter, trail, western pleasure, judged hunter/jumpers and gaited horses, sorted cows, and even trained saddleseat, western pleasure and halter Arabs for a few years in my twenties. I’ve taken a stretch of lessons for eventing, and even had an event prospect off the race track. I’ve gone to ranch clinics and roped calves for doctoring, and I’ve broke more colts than I can count, a few older horses to boot. So I’ve got a pretty well rounded perspective when it comes to horsemanship and what is and isn’t abuse.

I don’t support true abuse in any event or discipline – rodeo or otherwise. But when someone calls out rodeo and makes a blanket statement that it’s abusive but other disciplines get a pass, I have to stand up. There’s abuse that happens in ALL disciplines. Look at Rolkur in Dressage, or riding horses with broken legs in the Kings Cup Endurance Race, pushing horses past their ability in Eventing, or tying horses up for hours in Western Pleasure.

If putting a flank strap that’s as tight as a rear cinch would be on a ranch saddle or a packing set up, on a horse is considered abuse, then those horse riding/showing folks calling it abuse might want to be aware of the fact that there’s a whole other world out there that adamantly states even riding a horse is abuse because  horses had rather be out grazing and we’re making them carry us around. People say the mere act of trimming whiskers is abuse too, as well as using ANY type of bit. If that’s the definition of abuse, then a ton of us are abusing our horses!

As someone else pointed out in a comment on the post, the folks that call the mere act of riding abuse are out to ban all aspects of riding, and instead of bashing each other’s disciplines it’s important that we come together and support one another. 

Oh, and while I’m at it, they don’t break horses in rodeos and the bucking straps on bulls are not around their testicles. And as far as spurs, I’ve seen far more reining, western pleasure, and gaited horses with bloody sides than I ever have bucking horses.

In addition, if it weren’t for rodeo the bucking horses would be bound to a Mexico slaughter house because they like to buck and no one wants a horse they can’t stay on or that’s dangerous. I’d much rather a horse have two square meals a day, get vet care, and only have to work at most 16 SECONDS every weekend than to see them on a truck for 48 hours without food or water just to be cut up while they’re still alive at the end. Heck, my horses work a LOT harder than they do!

Maybe not all the stock contractors or competitors are perfect when it comes to dealing with bulls and horses (I say get some first hand ranching experience and dealing with irate stock without pens and then you can judge.) But then not every rider that rides a dressage pattern, jumps a cross country course, or rides a class down the rail is either. There are poor horsemanship and stockmanship examples in every facet of the horse world but they aren’t the example of what it’s about, and the exact same applies to rodeo.

Rodeo, the people involved, and all the things it stands for will always be near and dear to my heart. I love and appreciate all disciplines because in the end it’s about what a horse and a rider can do together.

Copyright F.J. Thomas